Tag Archives: WWF
TEDxWWF – Kamal Quadir: Audacity to take Part

TEDxWWF – Kamal Quadir: Audacity to take Part

Kamal Quadir is the CEO of bKash. Kamal talks about how digital platforms are increasingly becoming available in poor countries at a reasonable cost, and so is the endless flow of innovative applications that are riding on those platforms. The trick is to make poor people see that they are already well armed to take part in the revolution.

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REDD+ in DRC – Local Action, Global Impact

REDD+ in DRC – Local Action, Global Impact

The Democratic Republic of Congo is actively engaged in preparing for REDD+ implementation. In this short video produced by WWF, Tosi Mpanu Mpanu, head of the government’s official agency on REDD+, CN-REDD, describes the nation’s commitment to REDD+ and needs to scale-up REDD+ in the country.

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REDD+ for People and Nature – Mai-Ndombe, DRC

REDD+ for People and Nature – Mai-Ndombe, DRC

WWF has worked with the support and cooperation of the government of DRC, local partners, and local communities to develop and implement REDD+ readiness activities in the Mai-Ndombe area of DRC. This short video begins to tell the story of this work.

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Inside Wildlife Crime

Inside Wildlife Crime

Smuggled tiger kittens and burning ivory, follow the trail of wildlife crime from Gabon in Africa to Thailand in Asia. WWF launches its Advocacy report at the UN in New York.

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Tuna Fisheries of Mabul

Tuna Fisheries of Mabul

WWF Malaysia take an in depth look at the current state of tuna fishing in Mabul.

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On Borrowed Time

On Borrowed Time

On Borrowed Time, launched in conjunction with World Tiger Day 2011, trains a spotlight on the poaching crisis in Belum-Temengor and calls for the problem to be put on the national agenda. These forests in northern Perak are of critical importance for the conservation of tigers and other endangered species, yet research and monitoring by WWF-Malaysia and TRAFFIC Southeast Asia since 2008 have documented decimation of the wildlife by relentless illegal hunting, with little standing in poachers’ way.

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Stop IT – Stop illegal trade in wildlife – it’s a serious crime

Stop IT – Stop illegal trade in wildlife – it’s a serious crime

Illegal wildlife trade is a serious crime. It involves highly organised criminal networks, often linked to other international crimes such as drugs and arms smuggling, and the corruption of officials. TRAFFIC and WWF staff who fight to stop this trade in Asia and Africa describe the problems and their essential work to tackle this crime.

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STOP IT – Stop the illegal trade in rhino horn and ivory

STOP IT – Stop the illegal trade in rhino horn and ivory

TRAFFIC’s global elephant and rhino programme leader describes the current rhino and elephant poaching crisis, and the illegal trade in their horn and ivory that is driving this. Illegal wildlife trade is a highly organised, serious crime that TRAFFIC and WWF are working to stop. Governments need to take action to protect wildlife from poaching and illegal trade. Everyone can play their part to help stop illegal wildlife trade.

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Stop IT – Stop illegal trade in timber

Stop IT – Stop illegal trade in timber

Illegal wildlife trade is a serious crime. TRAFFIC’s forest and trade officer for central Africa describes the scale of the illegal logging problem in the region, its links to animal poaching, and what is needed to stop this crime.

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STOP IT –  together we can end illegal trade in rhino horn – Part 2

STOP IT – together we can end illegal trade in rhino horn – Part 2

A look at the use of rhino DNA analysis in tracing the illegal trade back to the animals killed, and the importance of obtaining the political support needed to succeed.
Joseph Okori, WWF’s African rhino programme coordinator, discusses the illegal rhino horn trade, and wider rhino conservation issues.

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