Life Without Lights

In Ghana the sun sets at 6pm and rises at 6am which means many communities lacking electricity live half their lives in darkness.
Electricity provides a step on the ladder of economics: lights to study and cook by, machinery and refrigeration, and a standard of living that would attract teachers, nurses, and other civil service workers from the city, not to mention foreign tourists. Potential economic growth is stifled and poverty’s cyclical nature is perpetuated however some forms of progress are happening.

In Ghana the sun sets at 6pm and rises at 6am which means many communities lacking electricity live half their lives in darkness.
Living without lights is more than just a minor inconvenience. Electricity provides a paramount step on the ladder of economics, and northern villagers know what is being kept from them: lights to study and cook by, machinery and refrigeration, and a standard of living that would attract teachers, nurses, and other civil service workers from the city, not to mention foreign tourists. Potential economic growth is stifled and poverty’s cyclical nature is perpetuated.

Some forms of progress are happening and a number of surprising modern amenities reveal themselves in the night. Mobile phones are widespread and a growing local film industry allows northerners to see movies in a setting and language familiar to them for the first time in their history. All of this exists despite the absence of a convenient outlet in which to plug basic electronic appliances.

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